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Anthony Bowmer

Film Studies graduate, writer, and sometimes filmmaker. Ingmar Bergman is my favorite director, Tokyo Story is my favorite film, and I’m an aspiring connoisseur of Japanese exploitation. Tetsuo: The Iron Man is one of cinema’s unheralded masterpieces.

42 Articles Published | Follow:
Flaming Ears (Review): A Queer Rebellion Against Convention

Flaming Ears disregards convention at all turns, embracing its underground roots and queer storytelling to create something both mystifying and exhilarating.

Neptune Frost (Review): “Picture a Dream and Dare to Live It”

Directed by Saul Williams and Anisia Uzeyman, Neptune Frost is a dreamlike afro-futurist musical that offers insightful commentary on gender and colonialism.

Ahed’s Knee (Film Review): What You Can’t Say

Ahed’s Knee, the latest film from Synonyms director Nadav Lapid, finds him channeling real life tragedy into something furious, abrasive, and unabashedly ugly.

RRR (Film Review): Blockbuster Cinema Is Back

At just over 3 hours long, S.S. Rajamouli’s bombastic action epic RRR (Rise Roar Revolt) is a gleefully entertaining return of extravagant blockbuster cinema.

The Top 10 Pinku-Eigas

In this list of the top 10 pinku-eigas, we will delve into the lurid depths of some of the most tantalizingly provocative films Japanese cinema has to offer.

Air Doll (Review): “A Marvelous Coincidence”

Air Doll, from writer/director Hirokazu Kore-eda, is a life-affirming yet tragic tale destined to make your heart soar even as it breaks it. 

Lingui, The Sacred Bonds (Review): In the Name of Solidarity

Lingui, The Sacred Bonds creates an incisive political parable through purposeful visuals and refreshingly straightforward…

Hester Street: “Goodbye O Lord, I’m Going to America” (NYFF Review)

Carol Kane shines in Joan Micklin Silver’s Hester Street, an underseen staple of American independent filmmaking that thoughtfully explores immigration and assimilation.

The Round-Up: A Hungarian Classic Stunningly Restored (NYFF Review)

The Round-Up, directed by Hungarian master Miklós Jancsó and playing at NYFF in a brilliant new restoration, is an evocative and bleak political parable.

Evangelion: 3.0+1.0 Thrice Upon a Time: A Thrilling Conclusion (Review)

Evangelion: 3.0+1.0 Thrice Upon a Time, directed by the visionary Hideaki Anno,is a thrilling and moving farewell to the Neon Genesis Evangelion universe.