Avatar

Serena Seghedoni

122 Articles Published | Follow:
Nine Days: A Stunning Investigation on Life (AFI Fest Review)

Seen through the eyes of five souls competing to be born, Nine Days is a poignant analysis of existence that reminds us of what makes life worth living.

Limbo: An Ode to A Past Identity (LFF Review) (LFF Review)

Limbo documents the refugee experience with irony, wit and heart, telling the tale of a young Syrian musician waiting for asylum on a remote Scottish island.

A Common Crime (Un Crimen Común): a Political Drama Disguised as a Thriller (LFF Review)

A Common Crime (Un Crimen Común) explores the evils of contemporary Argentina through the eyes of a guilt-ridden middle-class woman.

Supernova: Firth and Tucci Shine, But the Fireworks Do Not Go Off (LFF Review)

Colin Firth and Stanley Tucci excel in Supernova, a well-meaning, delicate drama whose flawed screenplay prevents any real emotion from getting through.

The Town of Headcounts (Ninzu No Machi) is the Best Dystopian Drama You’ll See This Year (VIFF Review)

Set in a Town of nameless people, The Town of Headcounts (Ninzu No Machi) is a clever dystopian drama and a brave, accurate analysis of modern societal dynamics.

September 2020: The Best Films of the Month

From Netflix’s The Devil All The Time and other streaming releases to festival favourites like Nomadland and One Night in Miami, here are September 2020 ‘s highest rated films on Loud and Clear.

2020 Emmy Awards: The Full List of Winners

The 2020 Emmy Awards took place last night at the Staples Center in Los Angeles: let’s take a look at the full list of winners!

Summer of 85 (Été 85): Raw, Wise and Heart-Wrenchingly Good (Review)

In Summer of 85 (Été 85), François Ozon puts his own spin on Aidan Chambers’ coming-of-age novel Dance On My Grave, crafting a complex, meaningful story about love, loss and growth.

The Devil All The Time: Slow-Burning, Gothic Crime Drama Achieves Greatness At The End (Review)

Tom Holland and an all-star cast shine in The Devil All The Time, a midwestern gothic crime drama whose well-crafted, meaningful ending makes up for a confused narrative structure.

One Night in Miami: “It’s Been A Long Time Coming, But A Change Is Gonna Come” (Review)

In One Night in Miami, Regina King explores the 1964 meeting between Cassius Clay, Malcom X, Jim Brown and Sam Cooke to bring a timely analysis of racism and social change.