Avatar photo

Atreyo Palit

Wannabe cinephile, with at least 90% of my head filled just with all things cinema. Tend to be a bit strict with critiquing popular culture, but am a major fan of light entertainment from time to time. I never moved on from Xavier Dolan’s Mommy, and my favourite aspect of film is writing, with my personal favourite screenwriter being Celine Sciamma. DC over Marvel anyday, unless it’s Netflix because Daredevil is my favourite TV show after Fleabag and Brooklyn Nine-Nine. I live to spread the word of underrated media, and I’ll always uphold animation as the most powerful medium of narration.

7 Articles Published | Follow:
Great Freedom (Review): Hans Was Here and So Was Viktor

Great Freedom chronicles the life of a homosexual man in Germany during a time when it was illegal to be gay through a love story that unfolds in prison.

A Night in the Fields (Review): A Tale Of Masculinity In Teens

Guillaume Grélardon’s A Night in the Fields, an endearing ode to the absurdity of life as an adolescent boy, takes us on a fond, humorous but intense adventure.

The Woman Who Ran (Review): A Warm Embrace for the Lonely

The Woman Who Ran plays like a leisurely stroll through familiar friendly spaces and feels like a journey of self-discovery in which all stress melts away.

The Neon Demon (Review): The Beauty Is The Beast

With haunting imagery, The Neon Demon meticulously critiques an industry that seems to run on the philosophy that “True beauty is the highest currency we have.”

Maika (Sundance Review): A Cute Nostalgic Ride for 90s and 2000s Kids

Reminiscent of Disney Channel kids’ adventure films, Maika is a fresh take on the E.T storyline, told with a fondness for any child’s worldview.

A Taste of Hunger (Review): Worth a Watch for the Food

A Taste of Hunger wanders aimlessly between narrative directions without exploring the competitive culinary world enough, despite having enough time to do so.

The Social Network: Facebook’s College-Centric Origin Story

David Fincher’s The Social Network explores a side of college life not usually seen in movies, and scrutinizes the ones that usually are.